Contact Us About Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research

Welcome to the South East Asian Biodiversity Website: Gardens
(Updated on Friday, October 17, 2003 )

Gardens

Brunei
Kampuchea (formerly Cambodia)
Indonesia
Laos
Malaysia
Myanmar (formerly Burma)
Philippines
Singapore
Thailand
Vietnam


Brunei
None Available

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Kampuchea
None Available

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Indonesia
Cibodas Biosphere Reserve (West Java)
Bogor Botanic Gardens (West Java)
Purwodadi Botanic Gardens (East Java)
Kebun Raya Eka Karya Bali (Bali Botanic Gardens)

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Laos
None Available

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Malaysia
University of Malaya's Botanic Gardens Rimba Imu
Penang Botanic Gardens

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Myanmar
Maha Bandoola Garden
Nanda Wun Garden

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Philippines
Manila Zoological and Botanical Garden (MZBG)
Makiling Botanic Gardens
Malacanang Garden
Baguio Botanical Garden

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Singapore
Sentosa Orchid Gardens
Singapore Botanic Gardens
National Orchid Garden

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Thailand
Queen Sirikit Botanical Garden
Nong Nooch Tropical Garden

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Vietnam
The Zoo and Botanic Gardens (Thao Cam Vien)
Flower Gardens (Vuon Hoa Dalat) (Vietnam)

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INDONESIA

Name of Garden: Cibodas Biosphere Reserve (West Java)

Logo: N.A.

Address: Cabang Balai Kebun Raya Cibodas-Sindanglaya
Pacet-Cianjur
Tel/Fax: (0255)512233

URL:http://www.conservation.org/SCIENCE/CPTC/CAPBUILD/UNESCO/
asia/cibodas2/default.htm

E-mail Address: kriclipi@ cianjur.wasantara.net.id

Description: Cibodas is one of the four Botanic Gardens which make up the Indonesian Botanic Gardens. Cibodas is notable as having a collection of plants found in cool, high altitude environments

Cibodas reserve contains more than 14,000 hectares of land from the sub-montane to the sub-alpine rain forest. The area is unique because this is the last area for montane rain forest in Jawa Barat and it has Javan endemic species.

Cibodas holds one of the highest levels of biological diversity, more than 900 species of vascular plants and 400 species of pteridophytes, mosses and fungi. In 1959, a species count by W. Meijer found 331 species of flora per hectare, including 78 tree species and 100 species of climbing plants.

The forest ecosystems in the reserve can be grouped into sub-montane (1,000 -1,500 m asl), montane (1,500 - 2,400 m asl) and sub-alpine (more than 2,400 m asl).

Sub-montane forest has the highest diversity of plant life and is characterized by large trees forming a tall canopy 30-40 m above the ground. Beside a rich variety of trees, there are also many species of ground flora, liana and orchid. Montane forest has a lower diversity of plants with fewer herb species than the sub-montane forest. As one climbs up into the sub-alpine forest, diversity continues to decline. This zone is characterized by smaller trees.

Besides the flora, Cibodas also house a high biological diversity fauna.

History: The Cibodas Reserve was established in 1889 and accepted by UNESCO as a Biosphere Reserve in 1977. With the cooperation of the Directorate General of Forest Protection and Nature Conservation of the Ministry of Forestry, Gunung Gede Pangrango National Park serves as a core zone of the reserve.

Related to nature conservation, the Cibodas Biosphere Reserve has served as a good model for education, research and public awareness. Cibodas has been the centre of much research over the last two centuries, and more than 200 research publications have been recorded.

Person to contact: Gunung Gede Pangrango National Park
Jl. Raya Cibodas PO. Box 3 Sdl. Cipanas
Cianjur - Jawa Barat 43253
Indonesia
Tel: 62-255-512776
Fax: 62-255-519415

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Bogor Botanic Gardens (West Java)

Logo: N.A.

Address:
Jl.Ir.H.Juanda 13,
PO Box 309
Bogor 16003
Tel/Fax: (051)322187

URL:http://www.bogor.indo.net.id/kri/a.htm

E-mail Address: kriblipi@ bogor.wasantara.net.id

Description: The Bogor Botanic Garden, Indonesia's first and foremost botanical garden, is 87 hectares of beautifully kept trees, plants flowers, lawns and ponds within a busy expanding city of 300,000 people. It is also a world famous institution for research and conservation that has developed over many years and is continuing to do so. The garden is an important part of Bogor city providing not only employment but a large recreational area for local residents, visitors from Jakarta and many passing tourists.

Bogor Botanic Gardens contains a wide diversity of flora, with an aquatic, cyrad, palm collection and many more other species of plants.

History: The founder of 's Lands Plantentuin, the name given to the Garden by the Dutch, was Casper Georg Carl Reinwardt, a German who moved to Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and studied natural sciences, specializing in botany and chemistry.

In 1817, at the age of 44, Reinwardt was appointed to the position of Director in agricultural business, arts and sciences on Java and neighboring islands. He was interested in investigating plants were widely used by the Javanese for domestic and medicinal purposes. Reinwardt decided to gather all these plants in a botanic garden in Bogor, at that time called Buitenzorg (meaning 'Without a Care'). This also provided an opportunity to collect plants and seeds from other parts of the Archipelago and the Botanic Garden would eventually make Bogor a centre for the promotion of agriculture and horticulture in Indonesia.

On May 18, 1817, 47 hectares of the grounds bordering the palace were established as a Botanic Garden. Reinwardt became the first director from 1817 to 1822, during which time approximately 900 living plants were introduced to the Garden.

Prior to this, Sir Stamford Raffles had been Governor of Java from 1811 to 1816 and during his residence in Buitenzorg attempted to lay out the Palace grounds as an English-style landscaped garden. He even brought in two gardens from Kew in London, UK. The monument he erected in memory of his wife, Lady Olivia Marianne, who died in 184, can be seen in the Garden.

The first catalogue of plants in the Garden (914 species) was published in 1823 by C.L. Blume (Director of the Garden from 1822 to 1826). This was the basis of the catalogue which is still used today.

In 1830, Johannes Elias Teysmann, a Dutch gardener, became curator of Bogor Botanic Garden and spent more than 50 years developing the Garden. Seven years later Justus Karl Hasskarl was appointed his assistant curator and convinced the director to re-arrange the plantings in the Garden by taxonomic families. This was a major undertaking as a huge part of the collection had to be transplanted. Some trees were too large to be moved as can be seen today by the date of planting shown on read labels.

Hasskarl proposed starting a library, which was opened in 1842 as the Bibliotheca Bogoriensis, and constructing a separate building for the Herbarium Bogoriense, which was opened in 1844.

In 1844 he wrote the second catalog. Over the 180 years of the history of Bogor Botanic Garden there have been many major contributions to science, agriculture, conservation and environmental education.

Person to contact: Dr Dedy Darnaedi (Director)

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Purwodadi Botanic Gardens (East Java)

Logo: N.A.

Address: Kebun Raya Purwodadi (Purwodadi Botanic Garden)
Pasuruan, East Java
Indonesia
PO Box 104 Lawang 65201
Tel & Fax: 62-(0)341-426046

URL:http://www. bogor.indo.net.id/
kri/a.htm

E-mail Address: kriplipi@ malang.wasantara.net.id

Description: Purwodadi Botanic Garden is used as a place for conservation and research on semi arid lowland plant species. Puwodadi is notable for having many plants dependent upon more seasonal climate of East Java. In December 1995, the garden had a collection of 3,323 species, from 940 genera in 149 families. This collection consists of Orchids 525 species, Zingiberaceae 40 species, Dioscoreaceae tuber crops 6 species, Fabaceae 160 species, Moraceae 133 species, ferns 80 species, bananas 3 species and 150 cultivars, and medicinal herbs 300 species. The facilities in the garden include a library, seed collections, nurseries and glass houses.

Besides being a place for conservation and research, the garden is also a place for public recreation. Recreational facilities provided include lawns, seats and shelters which all encourage visitors to relax and enjoy the serene surroundings. Visitors can also jog on the roads while enjoying the fresh air and admiring the diversity of flora in the garden. A small guest house is available especially for researchers and colleagues.

History: Purwodadi Botanic Garden is located at Purwodadi, in the countryside of Pasuruan, East Java and is situated on the main road which connects three cities in East Java; Malang, Surabaya and Pasuruan. It is about 24 km from Malang, 30 km from Pasuruan and 70 km from the capital Surabaya. It covers an area of 85 ha which is at an altitude of about 300 m above sea level. The average annual rainfall is 2366 mm.

Purwodadi Botanic Garden was established in 1939 by Dr D.F. van Slooten, as one of three branches of the Indonesian Botanic Gardens.

The main task of Purwodadi Botanic Garden is to inventory, explore and conserve semi arid lowland plant species of scientific value. In conducting this task, Purwodadi Botanic Garden has functions such as :
1. To inventory, explore and conserve species which have scientific value, especially the Indonesian flora requiring a relatively dry climate and growing in lowland areas;
2. To provide guidance, research and education facilities;
3. To make the garden available as a place for recreation.

Person to contact: Ir.Soerjono (Director)

Opening Hours: Bookings can be made through the office during work hours at least two days in advance.

Admission Fee:
Rp.1000.00 per person
Rp.2500 by car


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Name of Garden: Kebun Raya Eka Karya Bali (Bali Botanic Gardens)

Logo: N.A.

Address:
Cabang Balai Eka Karya Kebun Raya Bali
Candi Kuning
Baturiti
Tabanan 82191
Kotak Pos 3424
Denpasar 80034
Bali
Tel/Fax: (0368)21273

URL:http://www. bogor.indo.net.id/kri/a.htm

E-mail Address: krielipi@ singaraja.wasantara.net.id

Description: Eka Karya Botanic Garden is a unique place to visit in Bali, where visitors can stroll through cool and tranquil gardens, visit temples and traditional Balinese buildings, and learn about Balinese botany and traditions. The Garden combines scientific and conservation goals in a cool, mountainous setting; with adjacent forests and lake, wildlife such as birds and monkeys, and the attractive landscaping all joined in harmony. With a rich collection of 1187 species, Eka Karya Botanic Garden, Bali, is not only a forerunner in conserving Indonesia's flora, but one of the most beautiful gardens of its kind in the world.

The primary task of the Botanic Garden is to conduct research, inventory and protect Indonesian plant species native to moist upland areas, particularly from eastern Indonesia, as well as to provide useful scientific services and to increase public appreciation for conservation. In order to fulfill this task, Eka Karya Botanic Garden, Bali, conducts field exploration and surveys, and has been equipped with an herbarium, seed collection, and nursery, as well as the living collections of trees, ferns, orchids, cacti and other plants of scientific, economic, cultural and aesthetic value.

History: Eka Karya Botanic Garden, Bali, was established on July 24, 1959, with an area of 154.5 hectares, at an elevation from 1200-1450 metres above sea level; average temperature 18C and average rainfall 3000 mm. Located in the north-central highlands next to the Batukau Nature Reserve, the garden lies in the tourist district of Bedugul, close to Lake Beratan and the Ulun Danur Temple. Bedugul lies between the cities of Denpasar and Singaraja, and can be reached from both cities within one hour's drive.

Person to contact: Drs. IBK Arsana

Opening Hours: 8.00 am - 5.00 pm daily.

Admission Fee: Rp. 1,000 per person
With car Rp. 3,000


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MALAYSIA

Name of Garden: University of Malaya's Botanic Gardens Rimba Ilmu

Logo: N.A.

Address: University of Malaya
50603 Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
Tel: 7593273/7593238/7593265
Fax: 7560027

URL:http://www.cc.um.edu.my/

E-mail Address: webmaster@ umcsd.um.edu.my

Description: The garden is on a valley site situated behind the Fifth Residential College on the University of Malaya campus. The valley has a small stream which feeds a wetland area before filtering out through the easternmost boundary. While fulfilling its essential 'collection and curatio' function, Rimba Ilmu also works towards promoting awareness of the natural environment through the utilization of its resources and support facilities by the the University community and the general public.

Besides a general collection of species from a variety of families selected for teaching, special collections are being developed which include medicinal plants, wild orchids, palms, pandan, tropical fruit trees, gingers, aquatic plants, wild citrus relatives rare and endangered plants in need of conservation.

The Garden's atmosphere is one of peace and serenity. The casual visitor will find delight in following one of the several trails which lead to most parts of the Garden. For the photographer, an endless array of interesting subject matter is offered. For the more serious-minded, there are the garden's well-labelled plant collections and small reference library, and an experienced staff to assist you.

History: Rimba Ilmu or The Botanical Garden was established in 1974 out of a need to study and conserve some of the immense diversity of plant found in the Malaysian tropical rainforest. Given the task of developing the facility, the University's Department of Botany set out to convert about 40 hectares of hilly areas of abandoned rubber estate into an aesthetically pleasing and scientifically oriented garden.

Person to contact: The Chief Assistant Registar

Opening Hours: The Garden is open to the public during normal office hours.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Penang Botanic Gardens

Logo: N.A.

Address: N.A.

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: Also called the Waterfall Gardens, the gardens' original attraction was the Waterfall which cascades from a height of over 400 feet. The Waterfall was once an important source of water supply to the town folk of Penang. Charles Curtis returned to England in despair, for the water authorities were considering turning the entire Botanic Gardens into a reservoir. Fortunately, this plan was not implemented. Only a small reservoir was eventually built, at the foot of the Waterfall. To view the Waterfall, permission has to be obtained from the Penang Water Authority during office hours.

The Penang Botanic Gardens, located in an "amphitheatre of hills", is a natural aboretum. It became a naval store, ammunition dump, and torpedo assembly station during the Japanese Occupation.

The 72 acre gardens are the best loved gardens today but it is also intensively used by joggers and walkers due to the shortage of green open space in the city. The path around the Lily Pond offers what is probably the most accessible tropical rainforest, only a leisurely ten minute stroll from the Botanic Gardens gate.

The walk from the Lower Circular Road takes about fifteen minutes and goes past two prominent groups of palms and bamboo clusters along the Waterfall River. Two orchid houses provide comparison between cultivated hybrids and wild orchid species. The best time to admire the flowering trees is during the dry season, from February to April, when the Thai Bungor (Lagestroemia Loudonii), the Javanese Cassia (Cassia javanica) and the Rosy Trumpet (Tabebula rosea) burst in glorious sprays of colour.

Probably the best collection of plants is at the Fern House, for many years lovingly looked after by an old employee named Mohd. Ansari, who helped to introduce several species of monkey cups and ferns to the collection.

From the Lily Pond path you can take a ten minute climb to the site of what was formerly Charles Curtis' house but of which only a few bricks can still be seen. A walk along the Upper Circular Road takes an additional ten minutes. From the Upper Circular Road, you can take a detour to explore the fern rockery, which is a little forested path by the river.

Various hiking paths lead from the Botanic Gardens, to Penang Hill and to Mount Olivia at the north. Mount Olivia was the site of the Raffles' home and was named after Raffles' wife, Olivia, who had a romantic literary relationship with Raffles' best friend Leyden following his visit to their house in Penang.

The Penang Botanic Gardens has historically been responsible for planting out many of Penang's heritage roadside trees.

History: The Penang Botanic Gardens were established by Charles Curtis, its first superintendent, in 1884. Curtis was the architect and designer of the gardens, which were shaped through massive landscaping works, and which have remained relatively unchanged since his time. He replanted the former granite quarry and introduced new plants. Originally intended as "a nursery for the planting of colonial products", economic and horticultural plants were brought in from the Kew Gardens in England to the Penang Botanic Gardens via the Singapore Botanic Gardens.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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MYANMAR

Name of Garden: Maha Bandoola Garden

Logo: N.A.

Address: Cor.of Maha Bandoola St & Sule Pagoda Rd
Kyauktada Tsp

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: N.A.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Nanda Wun Garden

Logo: N.A.

Address: Inside Palace Grounds, Nan Myo

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: N.A.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: 6.00-18.00 daily

Admission Fee: N.A.


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PHILIPPINES

Name of Garden: Manila Zoological and Botanical Garden (MZBG)

Logo: N.A.

Address:
Adriatico Street
Malate
Manila 58-89-25

URL:http://www.fapenet.org/pinas/museum/mzoo.htm

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: Today it is home to 124 animals and 600 plant species and visited by an average of 1.5 M people a year. A group of animal and plant specialist, in particular, lead the line-up of people under the employ of MZBG. They do the most peculiar, perhaps dangerous and extraordinary job of keeping and caring for the wild, so every visit to the MZBG becomes enjoyable.

History: From swamps and squatters, to haven for the country's finest flora and fauna, the Manila Zoological and Botanical Garden (MZBG) was born.

Opened to the public 25 July 1959, the MZBG was a big task right the start. Fraught with the issues of where to site and how to dive our illegals from the once Harrison Park, not to mention the initial cost of infrastructure and the procurement of animals and plants, the MZBGwent through a series of Go and NO-GO talks, until people from all walks of life began putting in their stakes. All for a worthy cause of having a Zoological and Botanical Garden, which every Filipino can be proud of.

The brainchild of the late Mayor Lacson, Manilans cannot give more thanks also, to the members of the city council then. So with the late Sen. Gil Puyat, Teodoro Valencia of the media, the International Diplomatic Corps and hundreds of civic-minded Filipinos, who selflessly donated their time and money to the effort.

A 5 1/2 hectare spectacle, the MZBG cost some P1M to build. From the fencing, the digging up of grottos, building of the lagoon, an island and cages, to the paving of roads, it was widely awaited and widely accepted during its maiden opening to the public.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours:
7 AM To 7PM
(Monday to Sunday)

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Makiling Botanic Gardens

Logo: N.A.

Address: N.A.

URL:http://www.uplb.edu.ph/

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: The garden is a facility for scientific research and for recreation with fixtures such as swimming pool, picnic areas and nature trails.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Malacanang Garden

Logo: N.A.

Address: N.A.

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: N.A.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Baguio Botanical Garden

Logo: N.A.

Address: N.A.

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: N.A.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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SINGAPORE

Name of Garden: Sentosa Orchid Gardens

Logo: N.A.

Address: N.A.

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: The Orchid Gardens is a tranquil world of over 10,000 plants of orchids spanning more than 200 species.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours:
9am-6.30pm
Last admission 6pm

Admission Fee:
$3.50 (Adults)
$2.00 (Children below 12 years of age)


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Name of Garden: Singapore Botanic Gardens

Logo: N.A.

Address: Singapore Botanic Gardens
1 Cluny Road
Singapore 259569
Tel: (65) 471-9955
Fax: (65) 475-4295

URL:http://www.nparks.gov.sg/sbg/index.htm

E-mail Address: NPARKS_ Mailbox@NPARKS.GOV.SG

Description: Today the 139-year old Singapore Botanic Gardens is a star visitor attraction for the sophisticated traveller as well as the local resident. This Gardens possesses an array of botanical and horticultural attractions with a rich history and a wonderful plant collection old worldwide significance. Complementing these unique resources are sensitive developments providing visitor, educational and recreational facilities.

History: Sir Stamford Raffles, the founder of Singapore and a keen naturalist, set up the first Botanic Garden on Government Hill at Fort Canning in 1822 mainly to introduce into cultivation economic crops such as nutmeg, clove and cocoa. This Garden was closed in 1829.

The Gardens at its present site was founded in 1859 by an Agri-Horticultural Society, and was later handed over to the government for maintance. From an ornamnetal garden with roads, terraces, a bandstand and even a small zoo, it has come a long way in evolving into a leading equatorial botanic garden of 52 hectares.

Person to contact: Visitor Services Counter 4719943/33/34/55

Opening Hours: 5.00 am to 12 midnight

Admission Fee: No admission charge


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Name of Garden: National Orchid Garden

Logo: N.A.

Address: National Orchid Garden
1 Cluny Road
Singapore 259569
Tel. 471-9955
Fax 475-4295

URL: http://www.nparks.gov.sg/sbg/nog.htm

E-mail Address: NPARKS_SBG_Visitor_ Services@NPARKS.gov.sg

Description: Three hectares of carefully landscaped slopes provide a setting for 60,000 orchid plants comprising 400 species and more than 2,000 hybrids. The distinctive feature of the national Orchid Garden is its design concept which presents the display of plants in four seperate colour zones over most of its area :the "spring" zone ith its prevailing colours of bright and lively shades of gold, yellow and creams; the "summer" zone with its major tones of strong reds and pinks; the "autumn" zone of matured shades; and the "winter" zone of whites and cool blues.

The colour zonation is achieved by a careful blend of selected trees, shrubs, herbs and orchids (mostly hybrids) with matching foliage and floral colours. Other attractions within the National Orchid Garden are the VIP Orchid Garden show casing outstanding within the National Orchid Garden are the VIP Orchid Garden showcasing outstanding orchids from the Botanic Gardens named after State Visitors and VIPs from within and outside Singapore; the Tan Hoon Siang Misthouse featuring orchids display against a backdrop of cultural decor and the Yuen-Peng Mcneice Bromeliad collection with its display of over 20,000 plants representing over 800 types in the Pineapple family and the new soon-to-be-opened Orchid Cool House featuring plants from the cooler tropical highlands. This new feature will extend the range of orchid species that can be displayed in the National Orchid Garden.

History: The National Orchid Garden, opened on 20 October 1995 by Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew, is located on the highest hill in the Singapore Botanic Gardens.

Person to contact: Visitor Services Officer

Opening Hours:
Mon-Sun from 8:30am to 7:00pm
(last ticket sales are at 6:00pm)

Admission Fee:
Adults: S$2.00 per entry
Children under 12 years/ Senior citizen(>60 years) : $1.00


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THAILAND

Name of Garden: Queen Sirikit Botanical Garden

Logo: N.A.

Address: Queen Sirikit Botanic Garden
Box 7 Mae Rim
Chiang Mai 50180
Thailand
Tel: +53 299-753, +53 298-171(-5)
Fax: +53 299-754

URL:http://qbg.biotec.or.th/

E-mail Address: qbg@chmai.loxinfo.co.th

Description: The goals of the Queen Sirikit Botanic Garden, or QBG as it is popularly known, were also established at the outset. It would build up and maintain a collection of living specimens, both local and foreign; serve as a center to preserve and propagate endangered Thai plants; assemble an herbarium of dried plant specimens for identification and permanent reference; provide facilities for students and researchers from many backgrounds; and serve as a center for plant information, field study, and special programs in which Thai students can increase their knowledge and appreciation of the country's rich natural resources.

History: The garden's evolution begun at a conference held by the Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy in Bangkok. Concerned by the rapid disappearance of Thailand's native plants, some of them yet unclassified, the participants enthusiastically adopted a motion to develop a true botanic garden to collect, preserve and study such specimens.

The following year, coinciding with Her Majesty Queen Sirikit's auspicious 60th birthday, the Botanical Garden Organization of Thailand was officially established. In 1994, it received royal permission to name a pioneering garden in the North after Her Majesty. An extensive site in the Mae Rim district of Chiang Mai had already been selected.

Covering about 1,000 hectares, it is at the edge of the Doi Pui-Suthep National Park and consists of both flat and mountainous areas, the latter rising to 1,200 meters, watered by three streams that flow into a larger one called the Mae Sa. The fresh air and natural plant resources are ideal for botanical work, while the location offers easy access to both students and the general public from the surrounding area. An added attraction was the fact that the garden would block further encroachment by tribal groups who had already denuded adjacent territories. Directors and administrators from several renowned botanic gardens in foreign countries - among them Australia, China, Denmark, Sweden, Japan, the UK and the USA - visited the site and agreed that it had the potential to become a world-class facility.

With funding provided by the government, work began on the site in 1993. Roads were cut into the steep hillsides, walking paths laid out through the native forest, and the first buildings erected to house staff and various activities. A team of specialists from the famous Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, in England, arrived in 1994 to assist with the landscaping and advise on development strategies. During the first year, even as the project was just getting under way, more than 3,000 visitors came to the garden, most of them university students, along with 30 botanists from foreign countries.

On April 8, 1996, Her Majesty Queen Sirikit presided over the opening ceremony and marked the occasion by planting a native tree, setting a precedent that has been followed by other distinguished visitors. Since then, she and other members of the royal family have come to the garden on a number of occasions to inspect and admire its continuing development.

Person to contact: Dr. WeerachaiNanakorn, Director

Opening Hours: 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

Admission Fee:
Adult 20 baht
Child 10 baht
Car 50 baht


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Name of Garden: Nong Nooch Tropical Garden

Logo: N.A.

Address: On Km 163 Sukhumvit
Highway between Pattaya and Sattahip
Chonburi
Tel: +66-38-709358-62/ +66-38-238063
Fax: +66-38-238160

E-mail Address: kampon@loxinfo.co.th

Description: Located near Jomtien Beach on the Sukhumvit Highway, between Pattaya and Sattahip, Nong Nooch Tropical Garden, officially opened in 1980, quickly became a popular tourist destination for foreigners and Thai's alike. At these days, Nong Nooch Tropical Garden offers more than 500 acre (200 ha) of perfectly planted and maintained tropical landscapes and gardens, including two man made lakes, with countless trees, plants and flowers from all over the world. A famous place to go for people of all age, In addition to its primary function as a "Natural Paradise" Nong Nooch Tropical Garden provides for its visitors not only a colourful Thai cultural-and spectacular elephant show but restaurants, shopping center, souvenir shops, a museum, mini zoo as well as a beer garden and overnight facilities.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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VIETNAM

Name of Garden: The Zoo and Botanic Gardens (Thao Cam Vien)

Logo: N.A.

Address: Ho Chi Minh City

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: N.A.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.


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Name of Garden: Flower Gardens (Vuon Hoa Dalat) (Vietnam)

Logo: N.A.

Address: N.A.

URL: N.A.

E-mail Address: N.A.

Description: N.A.

History: N.A.

Person to contact: N.A.

Opening Hours: N.A.

Admission Fee: N.A.

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Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Block S6, Level 3, Faculty of Science
The National University of Singapore, Science Drive 2, Singapore 117600,
REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE
Tel: +65-6874-5082, Fax: +65-6774-8101